Depression and its impact on prostate cancer treatment

It would see both depression and prostate cancer are reciprocal and independent variables, each predicting the occurrence of the other. We need to associate more closely mental health and disease occurrence in all health media.

Science Life

Scott Eggener, MD, Co-Director of the Prostate Cancer Program at the University of Chicago Medicine Scott Eggener, MD, Co-Director of the Prostate Cancer Program at the University of Chicago Medicine

Depression often occurs with serious health conditions such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes, and can exacerbate symptoms and play a role in decision-making about treatment. Last year, Science Life spoke to William Dale and Ashwin Kotwal about their research showing that men who are depressed are less likely to get screened for prostate cancer. Other studies have shown increased rates of anxiety, depression, cardiovascular problems and even suicide that stem from uncertainty over prostate cancer treatment. But less is known about how depression affects overall outcomes and treatment decisions made by men once they have been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

In a study published in July in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, urologist Scott Eggener, MD, and his colleagues explored this relationship, and found that men with intermediate- or high-risk…

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